Cruise Search
Go

Hidden Gems of France & Spain

Time to see Britain’s overseas holiday hotspots in a new light. Uncover remote wonders and get lost in the romance on a two-week adventure through France and Northern Spain.

Cruise Only
14 nights

Mid size Ship Holiday
Gijon, Spain
Cherbourg
Nantes-Brest Canal
Bilbao

Call us now on 01756 706500 to secure your cabin!

AB

In Le Havre, see where Monet painted 'Impression, Sunrise', the work which inspired impressionism, sip the finest wines in Bordeaux and be sure to visit to the cutting-edge Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao. Art, cuisine, history and sea breeze swell together to create a truly unforgettable European love story.

Supposedly the burial site of St. James, the walled medieval town of Santiago de Compostela is a treasure house of history, with its magnificent carved stone façades, grand plazas and fascinating winding streets.

You are greeted with a charming seaside spot, granting perfect access to the largest city in the Basque country, Bilbao. Head to the world famous Guggenheim Museum, Museum of Fine Art and its breathtaking 14th century Gothic-style cathedral.

AB208 Operated by Ambassador Cruise Line

.

Hidden Gems of France & Spain Itinerary

Day 1 - Dundee

Days 2-3 - At Sea

Enjoy the facilities on board at your leisure.

Day 4 - Cherbourg

Originally a little fishing village, Cherbourg has developed into a historic port designed by Vauban. This was also a strategic naval port during the Napoleonic wars; there is a marina with over 1000 moorings. “Cap de la Hague” is to the West and the “Pointe de Barfleur” to the East. This port, which belongs to Normandy, is a region that has provided inspiration for countless artists and writers, and is the land of apple orchards and rolling farmland dotted with villages of half-timbered houses. Boasting a wealth of abbeys and châteaux, as well as a superb coastline, it offers something for everyone. Cherbourg was also the first stop of RMS Titanic after it left Southampton, England. On 19 June 1864, the naval engagement between USS Kearsarge and CSS Alabama took place off Cherbourg. The Battle of Cherbourg, fought in June 1944 following the Normandy Invasion, ended with the capture of Cherbourg on June 30.

Day 5 - Brest

Day 6 - Saint-Nazaire

A city with long maritime history, Saint-Nazaire is mostly known for its shipbuilding industry. Rebuilt after World War II, it offers activities and sights for a wide range of interests, from history buffs to sports enthusiasts.

Day 7 - Le Verdon-sur-Mer

Situated on the Garonne River, 70 miles (113 km) inland from the Atlantic, Bordeaux's origin can be traced back to the 3rd century when it was Aquitaine's Roman capital called Burdigala. From 1154 to 1453, the town prospered under the rule of the English, whose fondness for the region's red wines gave impetus to the local wine industry. At various times, Bordeaux even served as the nation's capital: in 1870, at the beginning of World War I, and for two weeks in 1940 before the Vichy government was proclaimed. Bordeaux's neo-classical architecture, wide avenues and well-tended public squares and parks lend the city a certain grandeur. Excellent museums, an imposing cathedral and a much-praised theatre add to the city's attractions. The principal highlights, clustered around the town centre, can easily be explored on foot.

Day 8 - Getxo

Day 9 - Gijón

The Campo Valdés baths, dating back to the 1st century AD, and other reminders of Gijón's time as an ancient Roman port remain visible downtown. Gijón was almost destroyed in a 14th-century struggle over the Castilian throne, but by the 19th century it was a thriving port and industrial city. The modern-day city is part fishing port, part summer resort, and part university town, packed with cafés, restaurants, and sidrerías.

Day 10 - La Coruña

La Coruña, the largest city in Spain's Galicia region, is among the country's busiest ports. The remote Galicia area is tucked into the northwest corner of the Iberian Peninsula, surprising visitors with its green and misty countryside that is so much unlike other parts of Spain. The name "Galicia" is Celtic in origin, for it was the Celts who occupied the region around the 6th-century BC and erected fortifications. La Coruña was already considered an important port under the Romans. They were followed by an invasion of Suevians, Visigoths and, much later in 730, the Moors. It was after Galicia was incorporated into the Kingdom of Asturias that the epic saga of the Pilgrimage to Santiago (St. James) began. From the 15th century, overseas trade developed rapidly; in 1720, La Coruña was granted the privilege of trading with America - a right previously only held by Cadiz and Seville. This was the great era when adventurous men voyaged to the colonies and returned with vast riches. Today, the city's significant expansion is evident in three distinct quarters: the town centre located along the isthmus; the business and commercial centre with wide avenues and shopping streets; and the "Ensanche" to the south, occupied by warehouses and factories. Many of the buildings in the old section feature the characteristic glazed façades that have earned La Coruña the name "City of Crystal." Plaza Maria Pita, the beautiful main square, is named after the local heroine who saved the town in 1589 when she seized the English standard from the beacon and gave the alarm, warning her fellow townsmen of the English attack.

Day 11 - At Sea

Enjoy the facilities on board at your leisure.

Day 12 - Le Havre

Le Havre, founded by King Francis I of France in 1517, is located inUpper Normandy on the north bank of the mouth of the River Seine, which isconsidered the most frequented waterway in the world. Its port is ranked thesecond largest in France. The city was originally built on marshland andmudflats that were drained in the 1500’s. During WWII most of Le Havre wasdestroyed by Allied bombing raids. Post war rebuilding of the city followed thedevelopment plans of the well-known Belgian architect Auguste Perre. Thereconstruction was so unique that the entire city was listed as a UNESCO WorldHeritage Site in 2005. 

Day 13 - At Sea

Enjoy the facilities on board at your leisure.

Day 14 - Newcastle upon Tyne

An urban city mixing culture, sophistication and heritage, Newcatle-upon-Tyne offers a range of activities and attractions. With more theatres per person than anywhere else in the UK, Newcastle has a wide range of arts and cultural attractions for visitors to enjoy, from the Theatre Royal – regional home to the Royal Shakespeare Company – to the famous Angel of the North.

Day 15 - Dundee

Price Includes

  • Full-board cruise in chosen cabin
  • Coffee and tea making facilities in every cabin
  • Tea and water available 24 hours a day in the buffet area
  • Onboard entertainment
  • Onboard enrichment and lifestyle programmes

Please contact us for the latest dates and prices

Call us now on 01756 706500

Map for Hidden Gems of France & Spain