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Adventure Down Under

Visit extensive national parks, experience millennia old Maori culture, and see stunning scenery on this epic voyage that will take you to the picture-perfect highlights of Australia and New Zealand.

Fly Cruise
14 nights from £4300pp

Luxury Holiday
Milford Sound
Sydney
Hobart
Tasmania

Call us now on 01756 706500 to secure your cabin!

SVL

Sail from Sydney to Tasmania's Burnie and Port Arthur.

Two days in Hobart are ample to enjoy the city’s dramatic cliffs, rolling vineyards and cultural pursuits. Sail on to New Zealand where you will be greeted with miles of Lord of the Rings grandeur, millennia of Maori culture and tons of wildlife both above and below the waves.

SV889 Operated by Silversea Luxury

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Adventure Down Under Itinerary

Day 1 - UK - Sydney (New South Wales, Australia)

With its glorious harbour, lavish golden beaches and iconic landmarks, Sydney is Australia's showpiece city. Creative and curious, discover the world-class cuisine, indigenous culture, and irresistible beach life that make Sydney one of the world’s most dynamic, exciting destinations. Sydney’s sparkling harbour is the heart of a richly cultural city. Overlooked by the metallic curves of the masterpiece of an Opera House, and that grand arched harbour bridge. Take it all in from the water, and admire the iconic landmarks, which are set before the city’s gleaming skyline backdrop. If you’re feeling adventurous, take the legendary climb up the smooth curve of the bridge – nicknamed the Coathanger - to soak in the shining city’s spread from a unique perspective. Spread out to tan on one of the world’s most famous stretches of sand - Bondi Beach. Restaurants and bars burble away in the background, while the sun beams down, and surfers curl and leap over pure rollers. Swim in spectacular salty ocean pools, or wander the beautiful Bondi to Coogee coastal walk for more of this sun-gorged stretch of prime coastline. Leaving the thrills of Australia’s largest city behind is surprisingly simple – take to the skies to be flown above skyscrapers and rippling ribbons of waves, out to majestic peaks, sheer cliffs and iconic rock formations - like the Three Sisters of the Blue Mountains. Or, drop in on wildlife sanctuaries caring for the country’s animals – from hopping kangaroos to adorably cute, cuddly koalas.

Day 2 - At Sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 3 - Burnie

Breathe in deep – here in Burnie, you’re tasting untouched air that is some of the cleanest anywhere in the world. Nearby Cradle Mountain once registered some of the world’s purest air - and the breezes here are purified by miles of uninterrupted ocean, stretching south to Antarctica. Tasmania itself is a place of sweeping National Parks, soaring granite mountain ranges and lakes reflecting spectacular scenery in glass-smooth surfaces. With dense eucalyptus forests coating the hills, and hikes rewarding with deserted sandy beaches, it’s no surprise that Burnie life revolves around getting outdoors and exploring the natural splendour of this shield-shaped island state of Australia. If mountain hikes sound a little strenuous, spend some time getting to know the island’s adorable wildlife. Visit Fern Glade Reserve to see the spade-like beaks of platypuses gliding through the waters, or the Little Penguin Observation Centre where Burnie’s own colony of adorable penguins waddle playfully. West Beach’s golden sand is also close by, perfect for lying back and soaking up some sun, or for watching on as surfers skip across the curling waves. Burnie has always been a place where things get made - in the past this came with a tinge of grey industry, but the city has now reinvented itself as a hotspot for all things creative. View the island’s most revered works, learn how to fold your own paper creations in workshops, and marvel at skilled local creators working hard in their studios at the Maker’s Workshop. Great food is also on this maker’s city’s agenda - feast on freshly shucked oysters, and award-winning cheeses. Later, you can toast the artisan spirit of Burnie with a glass of cool climate wine, or by swirling a nightcap of single malt – some of the world’s best whiskeys are produced here.

Day 4 - Port Arthur

Port Arthur, a historically somber UNESCO World Heritage site, sits in over 40 hectares of beautiful, landscaped grounds, close to the Tasman National Park, itself famed for its dramatic beauty. Today, Port Arthur brings the story of Australia’s colonial history to life through stories of the very people who lived here. A major site for punishing transported convicts who had further offended since deportation, many thousands of prisoners passed through the penal colony at one time or another. Throughout its history it has been a place of both torturous punishment and for some of the luckier ones, educational opportunity. Partly restored ruins of the colony and church, built with great skill by convicts in the 1830’s and the aptly named Island of the Dead, an island cemetery for convicts, are today prime attractions. This is a place jam packed with history, vividly brought to life by well informed guides and displays, it’s a moving and engrossing visit. In sharp contrast to the convicts, visitors are free to wander and explore. Turn up after dark, to look for evidence of the spookier side of Port Arthur, as part of the very popular ghost tour - Lit only by lanterns, the tour takes you through some of the most infamous buildings, quite different at nightfall. The guides will fill you in on some of the stranger goings on that have been noted in what is considered the most haunted place in Australia. The daily tourists departed, the long gone seem really quite close!

Days 5-6 - Hobart (Tasmania)

Mount Wellington's looming, cloud-wisped form is an ever-present sight as you explore booming Hobart, the cosmopolitan capital of Australia's most southerly state. A former British penal colony, nowadays Australia’s second-oldest city is a place to live the free and easy life. Encircled by dramatic cliffs, landscaped gardens and rolling vineyards, Hobart is also well stacked with cultural pursuits including museums, and respected - if controversial - galleries plastering new and old art to their walls. With fresh sea breezes and a fabulous location, Hobart is a creative place, where you can browse the produce of local artisans in Saturday's massive Salamanca Market - which draws visitors from all across Tasmania and beyond. Eat at waterfront restaurants, or rise up Mount Wellington's slopes to appreciate the remoteness of Hobart's location. From this elevated platform, you can look down across views of flowing forests, undulating mountains and endless ocean swallowing up the city. Further away, animal sanctuaries introduce you to the island's famous inhabitants, including the famous Tasmanian devil. Thirsty? Hobart has a long brewing tradition - so enjoy a refreshing ale poured from the country's oldest brewery. The climate's blend of generous sunshine and cool Antarctic breezes helps Hobart to produce its acclaimed wines, and thick clumps of pinot noir grapes hang from vineyards dotted along the valleys nearby. Taste the wines, accompanied by a platter of artisan cheese and sausage. Whiskey aficionados aren't left in the cold either, with international award-winning distilleries close by.

Days 7-8 - At Sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 9 - Bluff (New Zealand)

The most southernmost town in New Zealand, Bluff (or The Bluff as it is locally known) is perhaps the most European of all the settlements in the country. Called Campbelltown until 1917, the city was officially renamed after the 265 meter conical hill that towers above it. One of the farthest corners of the British Empire, the inaugural Royal Tour of New Zealand by Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, concluded at Bluff in January 1954. Nowadays however, it is the Bluff oysters that are the stars of the show. Reputed to be the best in the world, these local heroes are what have really put Bluff on the map and are celebrated every May with a lively festival honouring Ostrea chilensis (that’s Latin for Bluff oyster). But gastronomy aside (and it is mostly oyster related), Bluff offers the adventurous traveller much in the way activity. Gateway to Stewart Island, day trippers here might enjoy hopping on the ferry for the hour long trip to Stewart Island, or New Zealand’s third island. Unspoilt, tranquil and stunning, Stewart Island is a showcase for New Zealand’s undiscovered tourism spots due to its privileged (yet remote) position in the world. However, for those who wish to stay on the mainland, the Bluff Maritime Museum is a “must visit” for anyone travelling along the Southern Scenic Route, with fascinating historical information about the many early shipwrecks in these challenging southern waters and coastlines. The comprehensive network of walking tracks will delight the ornithologists amongst you – just don’t forget your binoculars!

Day 10 - Dunedin

The south-easterly coast of New Zealand's wild southern island is a haven for outdoor adventures, with masses of raw scenic beauty and thrilling coastline. Heading the Otago Harbour, Dunedin is a cosmopolitan city of culture and architectural splendour, with a distinctly tartan flare. Settled by the Scots in 1848, the romantically misty valleys and moody landscapes, continue to capture the hearts of visitors to these distant shores. Searing bagpipes echo down the streets in the Edinburgh of the South, which wears its Scottish origins proudly. Gothic revival architecture is scattered liberally, including the magnificent university - with its glorious clocktower - and the city's grand cathedral. Head to the elegant Octagon to see the statue to Robert Burns, whose nephew was a city founder. The railway station is perhaps the pick of this city's many artistic structures. Its glowing gardens and pretty mosaics add extra detail to the elegant, gingerbread building. It's also the perfect jumping-off point for romantic rail adventures along the coastline. The melodramatic coastline of the Otago Peninsula boasts dramatic cliffs and sea-sprayed beaches, as well as an abundance of animals. Explore cliffs laced with tunnels and hidden walkways, to get you up close and personal with Yellow-eyed penguins. Sea lions and seals also sprawl out on windswept beaches, drifting in and out of indulgent dozes. The south island's second-largest city regularly receives a top-up of youthful energy thanks to its healthy student population. Not that Dunedin is lacking a distinctly quirky personality of its own, as showcased by the event where locals race thousands of chocolate orbs down the world's steepest street - Baldwin Street. Museums in the city tell of Chinese influences, as well as the stories of early Maori settlers. Round off an active day sampling a South Island institution - an icy beer from Speight's Brewery.

Day 11 - Akaroa

With pretty painted cottages, overflowing verdant balconies and street names such as Rue Lavaud and Fleur Lane, you could be forgiven for thinking that you have stepped onto the streets of Provence upon arrival in Akaroa. And yet, here you are, in New Zealand’s South Island, less than 50 kilometres from Christchurch. The French connection stems from 1838, when Captain Jean Francois Langlois acquired the land for six British pounds (and questionable circumstances) from the Maoris. He then travelled home to France in order to bring back anyone who might want to join him in his new life. However, during his travels, the Treaty of Waitangi was signed (signatories included two Akaroa Maori chiefs) and New Zealand's first Governor, Hobson, declared sovereignty over the whole of New Zealand. Thus when Langlois and his settlers arrived back, they were faced with a choice: either return home to France or stay on. They chose the latter, and their legacy prevails. There are many stunning places on the coast of New Zealand, but none of them can quite hold a candle to Akaroa. Visually, it is stunning. Surrounded by natural wonders, the town (Maori for “Long Harbour”) stands on a peninsula formed by two volcanic cones, and is self-styled as nature’s playground. Such a moniker might seem superlative for other destinations, but not here: sheep graze almost right to the water’s edge, dolphins are regularly spotted in the many small, secluded bays and Lord of the Rings grandeur stretches as far as the eye can see.

Day 12 - Picton

The gateway to New Zealand’s South Island waits just across the Cook Strait from Wellington. Pretty Picton is a beautiful harbour town, lying on the cusp of the mighty scenery of the Marlborough Sounds Maritime Park, and providing an attractive link between New Zealand’s two main islands. The journey into the scenic Queen Charlotte Sound is a vista that only New Zealand can provide, as you sail through crumpled green peaks and folding hills, towards Picton’s little flotillas of yachts and endearing waterfront appeal. You could easily spend days here browsing art studios and galleries, nursing freshly ground coffees, and watching the undulations of the bay’s waters from Picton’s waterfront eateries. Or enjoying the coastal location and sea views while wandering Picton Memorial Park, among palm trees, bright flowers and benches that sit before sweeping views of the Sound. There’s a lot to explore beyond Picton’s limits, too, with mighty flayed inlets and glorious sweeping bays enticing you out into the sumptuous panoramas. The Marlborough Sounds are 1,500 km of eye-rubbingly beautiful scenery, formed by submerged valleys cascading down to the sea's waters. With its multitude of bays, coves and islands, you’ll find no shortage of walks, as well as plenty of opportunities to get out onto the calm water and push through the gentle waves in kayaks. Or sit back and enjoy weaving through the scenery from the comfort of a sailboat, looking out for abundant wildlife like penguins, dolphins and seals. Vineyards coat the sheltered land between the mountains and ocean – generating the perfect climate for cultivation. Sample a glass of the renowned Sauvignon Blanc, from the Blenheim wine region nearby for a taste of the fruitful produce.

Day 13 - At Sea

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is going to the gym, visiting the spa, whale watching, catching up on your reading or simply topping up your tan, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.

Day 14 - Bay of Islands

The Tasman Sea on the west and the Pacific Ocean on the east meet at the top of North Island at Cape Reinga. No matter what route you take, you'll pass farms and forests, marvellous beaches, and great open spaces. The East Coast, up to the Bay of Islands, is Northland's most densely populated, often with refugees from bigger cities—looking for a more relaxed life—clustered around breathtaking beaches. The first decision on the drive north comes at the foot of the Brynderwyn Hills. Turning left will take you up the West Coast through areas once covered with forests and now used for either agricultural or horticulture. Driving over "the Brynderwyns," as they are known, takes you to Whangarei, the only city in Northland. If you're in the mood for a diversion, you can slip to the beautiful coastline and take in Waipu Cove, an area settled by Scots, and Laings Beach, where million-dollar homes sit next to small Kiwi beach houses. An hour's drive farther north is the Bay of Islands, known all over the world for its beauty. There you will find lush forests, splendid beaches, and shimmering harbors. The Treaty of Waitangi was signed here in 1840 between Māoriand the British Crown, establishing the basis for the modern New Zealand state. Every year on February 6, the extremely beautiful Waitangi Treaty Ground (the name means weeping waters) is the sight of a celebration of the treaty and protests by Māori unhappy with it. Continuing north on the East Coast, the agricultural backbone of the region is even more evident and a series of winding loop roads off the main highway will take you to beaches that are both beautiful and isolated where you can swim, dive, picnic, or just laze. . The West Coast is even less populated, and the coastline is rugged and windswept. In the Waipoua Forest, you will find some of New Zealand's oldest and largest kauri trees; the winding road will also take you past mangrove swamps. Crowning the region is the spiritually significant Cape Reinga, the headland at the top of the vast stretch of 90 Mile Beach, where it's believed Māori souls depart after death. Today Māori make up roughly a quarter of the area's population (compared with the national average of about 15%). The legendary Māori navigator Kupe was said to have landed on the shores of Hokianga Harbour, where the first arrivals made their home. Many different wi (tribes) lived throughout Northland, including Ngapuhi (the largest), Te Roroa, Ngati Wai, Ngati Kuri, Te Aupouri, Ngaitakoto, Ngati Kahu, and Te Rarawa. Many Māorihere can trace their ancestry to the earliest inhabitants.

Day 15 - Auckland - UK

Blending beachy recreation with all the delights of a modern, diverse and thoroughly multicultural city, Auckland sits on the lucid blue-green waters of New Zealand’s north island. Known as the ‘City of Sails’, its two harbours will tempt you with waterfront walks, and the chance to breathe fresh sea air deep into your lungs while absorbing spectacular views of Auckland’s grand harbour bridge’s span. Take in the true scale of Auckland’s magnificent cityscape by ascending 192 metres to the Sky Tower, and looking out over the city’s gleaming silver towers, which reflect on the abundant waters below. Views over the bay and adjacent islands await, and you can share elegant cocktails at this dizzying height, above the mingling yachts of Viaduct Harbour. Immerse yourself in the rich history and culture of the area at Auckland Art Gallery, Toi o Tāmaki. Set beside tranquil fountains and handsomely landscaped flowerbeds of Albert Park, the French-Renaissance building houses New Zealand’s most extensive art collection, and exhibits works from Māori and Pacific artists. New Zealand is world-renowned for its captivating natural scenery, and day trips across the sparkling bays, to nearby islands like Waiheke, Tiritiri Matangi, and Rangitoto, are always tempting. Discover lava caves, grape-laden vineyards and flourishing wildlife in the Hauraki Gulf’s islands. You’ll also find an exceptional 360-degree panorama over the city, to the horizon beyond, from the heights of ancient Mount Eden. The spectacular dormant volcano rises improbably from a city suburb, and also lends its name to Eden Park – the unusual, translucent stadium of New Zealand’s mighty All Blacks. The excursions are provided as a sample of what may be offered on this voyage and are subject to change. We are constantly updating our shore excursion programme with immersive and authentic experiences, so please do not hesitate to review your tour programme choice closer to your sail date. We invite guests to visit my.silversea.com for the most updated information.

Price Includes

  • 14-night all-inclusive cruise
  • All flights and transfers
  • Butler service in every suite on board
  • Unlimited free WiFi on board
  • High staff-to-guest ratio
  • Choice of dining venues on board
  • Beverages in-suite and throughout the ship, including champagne, select wines and spirits
  • Onboard entertainment
  • Onboard gratuities
  • Shore excursions as mentioned in the itinerary
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2024 Departures £ price per person based on 2 people sharing

  • November
    • Nov 22nd - Sydney, New South Wales to Auckland - Sailing on: Silver Muse From: £4400
      Vista Suite Panorama Suite Classic Veranda Suite Superior Veranda Suite Deluxe Veranda Suite Silver Suite Royal Suite Grand Suite Owner's Suite
      Blue Water Price from: £4400 Blue Water Price from: £5000 Blue Water Price from: £5200 Blue Water Price from: £5400 Blue Water Price from: £5700 Blue Water Price from: £11300 Blue Water Price from: £16400 Blue Water Price from: £19400 Blue Water Price from: £24500

2025 Departures £ price per person based on 2 people sharing

  • January
    • Jan 19th - Sydney, New South Wales to Auckland - Sailing on: Silver Muse From: £4300
      Vista Suite Panorama Suite Classic Veranda Suite Superior Veranda Suite Deluxe Veranda Suite Silver Suite Royal Suite Grand Suite Owner's Suite
      Blue Water Price from: £4300 Blue Water Price from: £4700 Blue Water Price from: £4800 Blue Water Price from: £5100 Blue Water Price from: £5400 Blue Water Price from: £13500 Blue Water Price from: £19500 Blue Water Price from: £23200 Blue Water Price from: £29100

Price Information

  • Please note prices are updated regularly from a third party price feed and may fluctuate from those shown. Please contact us for latest prices
  • Prices shown usually include all available discounts
Map for Adventure Down Under