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Cuba and Treasures of the Caribbean

Swap cold nights for warm days with a Caribbean cocktail on this spectacular 42-night no-fly cruise to the wonderful Cuba and Caribbean Islands. Visit places such as Bridgetown, Montego Bay, and Havana.

No Fly Cruise
42 nights from £2819pp

Mid size Ship Holiday
  • Barbados
  • Antigua, Caribbean
  • Sao Vicente, Cape Verde
  • Montego Bay, Jamaica
  • Grenada

Call us now on 01756 706500 to secure your cabin!

AB

Cure those cold winter blues by escaping to the Caribbean’s crystal-clear seas and cloudless skies on a truly magical voyage filled with sun-kissed serenity and tropical treasures.

Whether you’re soaking in Cuba’s retro city glory or losing yourself along palm-fringed beaches, dramatic volcanoes or tropical rainforests, the West Indies’ mosaic of islands is a one-stop shop for paradise hunters and active adventurers. Sample authentic Caribbean cuisine and move to a new rhythm as you take in the dazzlingly diverse island scenes.

AB122 Operated by Ambassador Cruise Line

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Cuba & Treasures of the Caribbean Itinerary

Day 1 - Tilbury (UK)

Just 22 nautical miles down river from the Tower Bridge in London, Tilbury is a popular turnaround port for cruises visiting Baltic and Northern European destinations.

Days 2-3 - At Sea

Enjoy onboard facilities at your leisure.

Day 4 - Leixões (Portugal)

Ever since the Romans constructed a fort here and began using it as a trading post, Oporto has been a prosperous commercial centre. In the 15th and 16th centuries the city benefited from the wealth generated by Portugal’s maritime discoveries, and later, the establishment of a lucrative wine trade with Britain compensated for the loss of the spice trade. Today, Portugal’s second-largest city is a thriving, cosmopolitan place and is famous for its production of the fortified, sweet 'port' wine. Its historic centre is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the city was also awarded the status of European Capital of Culture in 2001. A large sandbar prevents ships from sailing into Oporto itself, so for over a century they have used nearby Leixões instead, a man-made seaport constructed nine miles from the city. Leixões is one of Portugal's major sea ports and is also home to one of the country's oldest football clubs, winners of the Taça de Portugal cup in 1961.

Day 5 - At Sea

Enjoy onboard facilities at your leisure.

Day 6 - Funchal, Madeira

Formed by a volcanic eruption, Madeira lies in the Gulf Stream, about 500 miles due west of Casablanca. Discovered by Portuguese explorer João Gonçalves Zarco in 1419, this beautiful island became part of Portugal’s vast empire and was named for the dense forest which cloaked it - 'Madeira' means 'wood' in Portuguese. Sugar plantations first brought wealth here, and when King Charles II of England granted an exclusive franchise to sell wine to England and its colonies, many British emigrants were drawn to the capital, Funchal. Today’s travellers come to Madeira for the varied and luxuriant scenery, from mountain slopes covered with vines to picturesque villages and a profusion of wild flowers. The natural beauty of the island has earned it many pseudonyms such as ‘The Floating Garden of the Atlantic’, 'The Island of Eternal Springtime' and ‘God’s Botanical Gardens’ and our selection of excursions aim to show you why.

Days 7-8 - At Sea

Enjoy onboard facilities at your leisure.

Day 9 - Mindelo, São Vicente Island (Cape Verde Islands)

Your next stop will be Cape Verde’s cultural capital, Mindelo. Get along with the locals listening to the real morna in the bars of the old town and sipping the local drink, a sugarcane spirit. This island is also known by its British and Portuguese colonial architecture and pastel-coloured houses, the municipal market and the facades of the old Governor’s Palace.

Days 10-14 - At Sea

Enjoy onboard facilities at your leisure.

Day 15 - Bridgetown (Barbados)

Located beside the island’s only natural harbour, the capital of Barbados combines modern and colonial architecture with glorious palm tree-lined beaches and a number of historical attractions. Experience the relaxed culture of the city renowned for its British-style parliament buildings and vibrant beach life, and seek out the Anglican church and the 19th-century Barbados Garrison. The distance between the ship and your tour vehicle may vary. This distance is not included in the excursion grades.

Day 16 - Saint George's (Grenada)

Nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, cocoa those heady aromas fill the air in Grenada (pronounced gruh-nay-da). Only 21 miles (33½ km) long and 12 miles (19½ km) wide, the Isle of Spice is a tropical gem of lush rain forests, white-sand beaches, secluded coves, exotic flowers, and enough locally grown spices to fill anyone's kitchen cabinet. St. George's is one of the most picturesque capital cities in the Caribbean, St. George's Harbour is one of the most picturesque harbors, and Grenada's Grand Anse Beach is one of the region's finest beaches. The island has friendly, hospitable people and enough good shopping, restaurants, historic sites, and natural wonders to make it a popular port of call. About one-third of Grenada's visitors arrive by cruise ship, and that number continues to grow each year. Grenada's capital is a bustling West Indian city, much of which remains unchanged from colonial days. Narrow streets lined with shops wind up, down, and across steep hills. Brick warehouses cling to the waterfront, and pastel-painted homes rise from the waterfront and disappear into steep green hills. The horseshoe-shaped St. George's Harbour, a submerged volcanic crater, is arguably the prettiest harbor in the Caribbean. Schooners, ferries, and tour boats tie up along the seawall or at the small dinghy dock. The Carenage (pronounced car-a-nahzh), which surrounds the harbor, is the capital's center. Warehouses, shops, and restaurants line the waterfront. The Christ of the Deep statue that sits on the pedestrian plaza at the center of The Carenage was presented to Grenada by Costa Cruise Line in remembrance of its ship, Bianca C, which burned and sank in the harbor in 1961 and is now a favorite dive site. An engineering feat for its time, the 340-foot-long Sendall Tunnel was built in 1895 and named for Walter Sendall, an early governor. The narrow tunnel, used by both pedestrians and vehicles, separates the harbor side of St. George's from the Esplanade on the bay side of town, where you can find the markets (produce, meat, and fish), the Cruise Ship Terminal, the Esplanade Mall, and the public bus station.

Day 17 - Kingstown (St Vincent & the Grenadines)

Days 18-19 - At Sea

Enjoy onboard facilities at your leisure.

Day 20 - Montego Bay (Jamaica)

One of Jamaica's largest resort cities, Montego Bay offers a range of activities bound to interest an array of visitors, from arts enthusiasts to the more adventurous type.

Day 21 - Santiago de Cuba (Cuba)

If ever a city could talk, then Santiago de Cuba would have a lot to say! With its revolutionary history and distinguishing Afro-Caribbean style, this is a city that puts passion at the top of its list. Much like New Yorkers and Angelinos, Londoners and Mancunians, Habaneros and Santiguans enjoy an amical rivalry; if Havana is the sexy little sister, then Santiago is its more responsible older sibling. View less Like the rest of Cuba, Santiago has a timeworn, once-majestic feel; yet despite this it holds its head high and is considered the culture capital of Cuba. Rumour has it that Son – a precursor dance to Salsa – was born here, while the balcony in Parque Cespedes that Fidel Castro gave his victory speech from in 1959 is still intact. Castro’s ashes have been laid to rest in the city cemetery such was his love for the city. This part of the island is gloriously off the tourist path – such as it is – of Havana and offers a fascinating glimpse of authentic Cuba. Retaining its much loved vibrancy, Santiago de Cuba’s identity has been more shaped by its proximity to the Dominican Republic than to Havana.

Day 22 - Santiago de Cuba

If ever a city could talk, then Santiago de Cuba would have a lot to say! With its revolutionary history and distinguishing Afro-Caribbean style, this is a city that puts passion at the top of its list. Much like New Yorkers and Angelinos, Londoners and Mancunians, Habaneros and Santiguans enjoy an amical rivalry; if Havana is the sexy little sister, then Santiago is its more responsible older sibling. View less Like the rest of Cuba, Santiago has a timeworn, once-majestic feel; yet despite this it holds its head high and is considered the culture capital of Cuba. Rumour has it that Son – a precursor dance to Salsa – was born here, while the balcony in Parque Cespedes that Fidel Castro gave his victory speech from in 1959 is still intact. Castro’s ashes have been laid to rest in the city cemetery such was his love for the city. This part of the island is gloriously off the tourist path – such as it is – of Havana and offers a fascinating glimpse of authentic Cuba. Retaining its much loved vibrancy, Santiago de Cuba’s identity has been more shaped by its proximity to the Dominican Republic than to Havana.

Day 23 - At Sea

Enjoy onboard facilities at your leisure.

Day 24 - Havana

It was Hemmingway’s favourite haunt and it’s on every traveller’s bucket list, so let the shabby grandeur of Havana work its tender charms and fall in love with the rhythm and pulse of this city so long closed to mass tourism. Drink in the years of colonial history amid a colourful backdrop of emerging modernity, and be transported – both figuratively and literally if you count the fantastic 1950’s automobiles that mosey around waiting to pick up a tourist or two – by another era. Equal parts shabby, chic, timeworn and magnificence; Havana is a city that defies all definition. Full of charm, culture, a troubled past and promising future this is perhaps the Caribbean’s most interesting destination. Five decades of American embargo have made Havana, along with the rest of Cuba, an authenticity hunter’s dream. However, with the recent relaxation in entry laws, the times they are a-chaging, so now is the time to travel. The chequered history, socialist regime, revolution and cultural resurgence make the city centre something of a dichotomy; prosperity shines through in some neighbourhoods, while many areas still remain underdeveloped. But the famed unbreakable spirit still thrives and inequalities are being addressed, making Havana one of the most exciting destinations on the planet. In a nutshell, there are many reasons why you need to go to Havana. The warm, tropical weather. The bright freshness of a perfect mojito. The cultural smorgasbord that is the city centre. The friendly locals. The churches, cigar factories, artists' studios, museums, restaurants and UNESCO heritage sites ... Yet, there is one reason that stands head and shoulders above the rest on why you should visit Havana – it’s just so magical.

Day 25 - Havana

It was Hemmingway’s favourite haunt and it’s on every traveller’s bucket list, so let the shabby grandeur of Havana work its tender charms and fall in love with the rhythm and pulse of this city so long closed to mass tourism. Drink in the years of colonial history amid a colourful backdrop of emerging modernity, and be transported – both figuratively and literally if you count the fantastic 1950’s automobiles that mosey around waiting to pick up a tourist or two – by another era. Equal parts shabby, chic, timeworn and magnificence; Havana is a city that defies all definition. Full of charm, culture, a troubled past and promising future this is perhaps the Caribbean’s most interesting destination. Five decades of American embargo have made Havana, along with the rest of Cuba, an authenticity hunter’s dream. However, with the recent relaxation in entry laws, the times they are a-chaging, so now is the time to travel. The chequered history, socialist regime, revolution and cultural resurgence make the city centre something of a dichotomy; prosperity shines through in some neighbourhoods, while many areas still remain underdeveloped. But the famed unbreakable spirit still thrives and inequalities are being addressed, making Havana one of the most exciting destinations on the planet. In a nutshell, there are many reasons why you need to go to Havana. The warm, tropical weather. The bright freshness of a perfect mojito. The cultural smorgasbord that is the city centre. The friendly locals. The churches, cigar factories, artists' studios, museums, restaurants and UNESCO heritage sites ... Yet, there is one reason that stands head and shoulders above the rest on why you should visit Havana – it’s just so magical.

Days 26-27 - At Sea

Enjoy onboard facilities at your leisure.

Day 28 - Grand Turk Island (Turks & Caicos)

Just 7 miles (11 km) long and a little more than 1 mile (1½ km) wide, this island, the capital and seat of the Turks and Caicos government, has been a longtime favorite destination for divers eager to explore the 7,000-foot-deep pristine coral walls that drop down only 300 yards out to sea. On shore, the tiny, quiet island is home to white-sand beaches, the National Museum, and a small population of wild horses and donkeys, which leisurely meander past the white-walled courtyards, pretty churches, and bougainvillea-covered colonial inns on their daily commute into town. But things aren't entirely sleepy: a cruise-ship complex at the southern end of the island brings about 600,000 visitors per year. That said, the dock is self-contained and is about 3 miles (5 km) from the tranquil, small hotels of Cockburn Town, Pillory Beach, and the Ridge and far from most of the western-shore dive sites. Pristine beaches with vistas of turquoise waters, small local settlements, historic ruins, and native flora and fauna are among the sights on Grand Turk. Fewer than 4,000 people live on this 7½-square-mile (19-square-km) island, and it's hard to get lost, as there aren't many roads.

Day 29 - At Sea

Enjoy onboard facilities at your leisure.

Day 30 - Road Town (Tortola, BVI)

Day 31 - Saint John's (Antigua)

With its superb beaches, historical attractions and beautiful coral reefs, Antigua provides a host of diversions. It is said that the island contains 365 beaches, one for every day of the year. Antigua maintains its traditional West Indian character, with gingerbread-house style architecture, calypso music and carnival festivities. St John’s has been the administrative capital since the island’s colonisation in 1632, and has been the seat of government since it gained independence in 1981. From the port you can explore the colourful Redcliffe district, with its restored wooden houses, and Heritage Quay with its shopping mall and craft shops. The city has some fine examples of Colonial architecture, including the twin-towered cathedral, built in 1845 and considered one of the finest church buildings in the Caribbean. All coaches in Antigua are operated by smaller vehicles, and commentary will be given by a driver/guide.

Days 32-37 - At Sea

Enjoy onboard facilities at your leisure.

Day 38 - Ponta Delgada (Azores)

Offering solace on the long journey across the Atlantic, Ponta Delgada is the Azores Islands' largest city, and a welcome relief for any weary sailor. Located on an archipelago of Portuguese islands, some 1,100 miles from the mainland, you can explore humbling volcanic scenery, as well as Sao Miguel's verdant landscape - which glows with colour when the hydrangeas that the Azores are known for bloom into life during the summer months. The striking black and white facade of the Church of Sao Jose welcomes you to the city itself, while you can head to the markets to pick up the pineapples, tea leaves and coffee beans that add a little flavour to the island. As the largest city of the Azores, Ponta Delgada is well stocked with places to eat delicious local seafood, or pick up a little shopping, as you enjoy setting your feet on dry land, following a long journey at sea. Volcanic firepower has carved these stunning islands, and a journey up to Caldeira das Sete Cidades is a must do, where you can hike beside the water-filled crater, and admire views of steep green walls, and the uninterrupted Atlantic Ocean stretching beyond them. Lagoa de Fogo offers yet more humbling views, with the crater lake dropping off sharply to rippled ocean far below.

Days 39-42 - At Sea

Enjoy onboard facilities at your leisure.

Day 43 - Tilbury (UK)

Just 22 nautical miles down river from the Tower Bridge in London, Tilbury is a popular turnaround port for cruises visiting Baltic and Northern European destinations.

Price Includes

  • Full-board cruise in chosen cabin
  • Coffee and tea making facilities in every cabin
  • Tea and water available 24 hours a day in the buffet area
  • Onboard entertainment
  • Onboard enrichment and lifestyle programmes
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2023 Departures £ price per person based on 2 people sharing

  • January
    • Jan 5th - Tilbury and back - Sailing on: Ambience From: £2819
      Cat 1 Standard Twin (Inner) Cat 2 Standard Plus Twin (Inner) Cat 3 Superior Twin Inner Cat 3S Superior Single (Inner) Cat 4 Premium Twin Inner Cat 6 Standard Twin Cat 6B Standard Twin Cat 6C Standard Twin Cat 6S Standard Single Cat 7 Standard Twin Cat 8 Standard Plus Twin Cat 9 Superior Twin Cat 10S Superior Single Cat 11 Superior Plus Twin Cat 12 Premium Twin Cat12S Premium Single Cat 14 Superior Balcony Cat 15 Superior Plus Balcony Cat 15S Superior Plus Single Balcony Cat 16 Premium Balcony JS Junior Suite DS Deluxe Suite
      Blue Water Price from: £2819 Blue Water Price from: £2999 Blue Water Price from: £3189 Blue Water Price from: £4779 Blue Water Price from: £3369 Blue Water Price from: £3749 Blue Water Price from: £3449 Blue Water Price from: £3569 Blue Water Price from: £5609 Blue Water Price from: £3859 Blue Water Price from: £4049 Blue Water Price from: £4249 Blue Water Price from: £6739 Blue Water Price from: £4419 Blue Water Price from: £4599 Blue Water Price from: £7289 Blue Water Price from: £5999 Blue Water Price from: £6409 Blue Water Price from: £9619 Blue Water Price from: £6819 Blue Water Price from: £8369 Blue Water Price from: £10229

Price Information

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  • Prices shown usually include all available discounts
Map for Cuba and Treasures of the Caribbean